EXHIBITION LISTINGS

ELISABETH FRINK: TRANSFORMATION
Until 7 May
Hauser & Wirth, Durslade Farm, Dropping Lane, BRUTON BA10 0NL
Tuesday - Sunday 10am - 4pm (19 January - 28 February), 10am - 5pm (1 March - 7 May)
Visit Website
On view until 7 May 2017, Hauser & Wirth Somerset presents a major solo exhibition of sculpture by the late Elisabeth Frink. The exhibition Transformation comprises a selection of Frink’s distinctive bronzes produced in the 1950s and 1960s, alongside a series of drawings that highlight the artist's skill as a draughtsman. Outside in the grounds are some of Frink’s most important sculptures from her later life, including the celebrated Riace Warriors. Frink’s art was directly influenced by her childhood and adolescent experiences. Growing up mainly in rural Suffolk, she enjoyed a countryside existence full of animals and birds, but set against the backdrop of war. Her father was a professional soldier who fought at Dunkirk. Frink was nine years old when the Second World War broke out. Living near an airfield, she often witnessed bombers fighting in the skies directly overhead, or returning to the base in flames. Later on in the war, while spending time in Devon, she narrowly avoided machine-gun fire from a German fighter plane. These events had a profound effect on her, as did her viewing of the first images released of the Nazi concentration camps. The impact of these experiences influenced Frink’s approach to her work and led to a life-long preoccupation with conflict, injustice and man’s capacity for brutality. She had an interest in Celtic mythology, in particular how man expresses himself through myths and metaphors, notably in relation to war. Frink’s range of subjects included men, animals and birds, exploring their shapes to convey tension, aggression and vulnerability.
‘DARTMOOR: A HAUNTED LANDSCAPE’
Until 2 April
Royal Albert Memorial Museum & Art Gallery, Queen Street, EXETER EX4 3RX
Tuesday - Sunday 10am – 5pm
01392 265858
Paintings by local artist Richard G. Hill explore the brooding and dark quality of the Dartmoor landscape and its folklore. Creatures from Dartmoor folklore confer a magical but dark atmosphere to his work. The raven, a common sight and sound on the moor. The black dog, which can represent the spirit of a past evil person. The Wish Hounds that ride through the night looking for innocent souls. Twilight and shadows also create magical shapes of people and animals in his paintings
‘HIROSHIGE’S JAPAN: STATIONS OF THE TOKAIDO ROAD’
Until 16 April
Royal Albert Memorial Museum & Art Gallery, Queen Street, EXETER EX4 3RX
Tuesday - Sunday 10am - 5pm - £4
01392 265858
This exhibition showcases a selection of Japanese woodblock prints from the series that made Utagawa Hiroshige (1797 - 1858) one of the best known of all Japanese artists. His landscape prints are among the most frequently reproduced of all Japanese works of art and were hugely successful both in Japan and in the West. He is particularly renowned for his landscape prints and his unusual compositions, humorous depictions of people involved in everyday activities and masterly expression of weather, light and seasons.
‘QUEEN VICTORIA IN PARIS’
Until 23 April
Royal Albert Memorial Museum & Art Gallery, Queen Street, EXETER EX4 3RX
Tuesday - Sunday 10am – 5pm
01392 265858
This exhibition shows forty four watercolours of Queen Victoria’s remarkable visit to Paris in 1855. The first time a reigning British monarch had visited the French capital in over 400 years, the visit ostensibly celebrated the military alliance between France and Britain against Russia in the Crimean War.
MEETING MODERNISM
Until 24 April
Russell-Cotes Art Gallery & Museum, East Cliff, BOURNEMOUTH BH1 3AA
Tuesday - Saturday 10am - 5pm
01202 451858 Visit Website
The Russell-Cotes travelled the world throughout the 19th century building up an eclectic collection of paintings. Curators continue their vision with work by significant artists but in a 20th century idiom
ELISABETH FRINK: TRANSFORMATION
Until 7 May
Hauser & Wirth, Durslade Farm, Dropping Lane, BRUTON BA10 0NL
Tuesday - Sunday 10am - 4pm (19 January - 28 February), 10am - 5pm (1 March - 7 May)
Visit Website
On view until 7 May 2017, Hauser & Wirth Somerset presents a major solo exhibition of sculpture by the late Elisabeth Frink. The exhibition Transformation comprises a selection of Frink’s distinctive bronzes produced in the 1950s and 1960s, alongside a series of drawings that highlight the artist's skill as a draughtsman. Outside in the grounds are some of Frink’s most important sculptures from her later life, including the celebrated Riace Warriors. Frink’s art was directly influenced by her childhood and adolescent experiences. Growing up mainly in rural Suffolk, she enjoyed a countryside existence full of animals and birds, but set against the backdrop of war. Her father was a professional soldier who fought at Dunkirk. Frink was nine years old when the Second World War broke out. Living near an airfield, she often witnessed bombers fighting in the skies directly overhead, or returning to the base in flames. Later on in the war, while spending time in Devon, she narrowly avoided machine-gun fire from a German fighter plane. These events had a profound effect on her, as did her viewing of the first images released of the Nazi concentration camps. The impact of these experiences influenced Frink’s approach to her work and led to a life-long preoccupation with conflict, injustice and man’s capacity for brutality. She had an interest in Celtic mythology, in particular how man expresses himself through myths and metaphors, notably in relation to war. Frink’s range of subjects included men, animals and birds, exploring their shapes to convey tension, aggression and vulnerability.
‘WINTER AND SPRING’
Until 31 May
Royal Albert Memorial Museum & Art Gallery, Queen Street, EXETER EX4 3RX
Tuesday - Sunday 10am - 5pm
01392 265858
This exhibition features a selection of drawings, watercolours and oil paintings from RAMM’s collection with a seasonal themes, as well as Devon Landscapes, Exeter and People. Devon Landscapes include 18th-century watercolours by John White Abbott and more recent works by Robert Organ and Alan Richards. There are also topographical drawings and watercolours of Exeter by Sidney Endacott and Francis Towne. Three recently acquired botanical watercolours by Reverend William Keble Martin are displayed. Seasonal scenes include William Henry Hunt’s exquisitely detailed Primroses and Bird’s Nest, along with Henry Hainsselin’s expressive work Friesland Boer Skating and botanical illustrations from The Concise British Flora by William Keble Martin.
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